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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 330 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 7:00am EDT
best of all, booktv talk to reyna grande about her memoir, "the distance between us." in the book she talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years late
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:15am EDT
about their memoir, "the distance between us." in the book she shares her experience of going up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
, this memoir. this is very personal. >> guest: it is extremely personal, yes. that's the only way i know how to write, and even with my fiction, even though it is fiction, it's also inspired by personal experiences, and with the memoir, you know, there were many times when i was afraid to go there because it was extremely perm, and i was not just writing about myself, but my family, about my parents, and there were many times i felt that i was writing things that i shouldn't, but then i felt that if i was going to write a memoir, i needed to be completely honest with the story, and to turn my pain and fear into my strengths instead of them being my weaknesses. >> host: reyna, did you write this originally in english or spanish? >> guest: yes, i always write in english first, but when i got to this country, i got so excited about learning english, i neglected my native tongue. for many, many years all i did was eat and breathe english, that by the time i got to college, i was a writing tutor and tutoring native english students and teaching them how to write better english, but then
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 4:15pm EDT
colored man's reminiscences of james madison and the entire memoir is included as an appendix in my book you will see that it starts with a preface. and intelligent colored man who works in the department of the interior. he was an eye witness to important history and i thought his recollections worth writing down in almost his own words. paul jennings was himself litter and learned to read and write as a slave. i discovered j.d. are was john brooks russell. he was the one who submitted to a history magazine in 1863 and two years later it was published as a slim volume by the same name with jennings's by line on the title page. there were very few copies ever printed. i am thankful that it was not altogether lost to history. it has been quoted by historians over the years especially the passages about the war of 1812 and we are celebrating the 200th anniversary of that war today. jennings had an exciting wartime adventures as he came of age and played a major role in helping madison rescue the enormous iconic stewart likeness of george washington just before the british burned the w
CBS
Oct 21, 2012 5:00am PDT
is jewish although he never found that out until he was 40. >> jennifer. >> my book is a memoir and it is it is not fish nor fowl and half poetry and half personnel stories. i am very honored to have been published by cappa press, wonderful cappa press started in 1969 and just relaunching now with my memoir. and my memoir is divided into 7 sections, what i call family or my family of origin, marriage, children, body, faith, outside or the outside world, and work. and there's a prol ogue and epilogue. it is a book about love and thankfulness and explains the title, when i was a freshman in college, i had a terrible very real feeling that i was not going to have a good life. this book is an extended rift on my surprise, my gratitude and i think i can say my hard work. and, in fact, creating a good life, receiving a wonderful life and having the blessings of truly a beautiful family. >> wonderful. it seems, jennifer and david that on the faces that each of your respective books seem so different but on the other hand. all three books seem to have a theme of what it means to grow as a h
Comedy Central
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm PDT
, everybody. my guest tonight is a country music legend, who has written a memoir luck or something like it. this is going to be a great interview. or something like it. please welcome kenny rogers! [ cheers and applause ] >> colbert: sit down. nice to see you again. all right. i am an enormous fan. >> thank you. >> colbert: you are one of the best selling artists of all-time, 65 albums. 120 million albums sold worldwide, three grammys, a pulitzer, a nobel, everything. you have got a hit in each of the last six decades, number eight best selling male vocal artist of all times! bruce springsteen is number seven and neil diamond at number 9. how does that work? do you get to tell neil diamond what to do? >> he works for me. >> colbert: he works for you. neal, get my shoes. >> springsteen calls you and says, kenny bring my car around. >> i have to go get his car. >> colbert: now, you have got a new book called luck or something like it. >> yeah. >> colbert: a memoir. okay. worldwide crossover country, ultimate actor, five miniseries worked based on one song, the gambler alone, why goin
ABC
Oct 4, 2012 11:35pm PDT
. >>> confessions of a centerfold. jenny mccarthy writes a surprising memoir about her journey from devout christian to sex symbol and playboy playmate. >>> and wild thing. lions in the backyard, monkeys in the living room. we'll meet the team confronting extreme animal lovers whose exotic pets could be lurking in a neighborhood near you. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," october 4th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. well, tonight, there may be a secret cash cow parked in your driveway. because that old car may actually be worth thousands of dollars more than you think. when it comes to selling your own car, some quick, easy, do it yourself tips could help you increase the price, and there's a lot more to it than just hanging up a gas station air freshener in there. abc's sharyn alfonsi brings us the best strategy for selling your old wheels. >> reporter: meet the gross family. brian, his wife lauren, dog layla and that's their baby, who often gets into the car through the trun
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00am EDT
eisenhower, is going home to glory iry, a memoir of the life of dwight d. eisenhower, 1961 to 1969. like her husband, julie eisenhower is also an author. she is in addition the daughter of the 37th president, richmond m. m. knickson from 1,973rd to 1975 she was assist stand managing editor for the saturday evening post, and weles welcome jean edward smith, white house book is, eisenhower in war and peace. he has written much praised biographies for franklin del know roosevelt roosevelt and ulysses s. grant. mr. smith is a senior scholar at --s' spent time at the at toro. and our moderate you're will be jonathan yardley. he has been a feeman fellow at washington university. his most recent book, a compilation of the most memorable reviews of noted and neglected book from the past. please join me in welcoming david and julie eisenhower, jean edward smith, and jonathan yardley. [applause] ... president eisenhower's career, started as a general and then ae president. we are getting with really one s of the most underrated figuresan in american history, both as a general and as presiden
SFGTV2
Oct 12, 2012 7:30am PDT
memoir with somebody living their life as a working journalist? let me preface it a little bit with someone who has similar tendency. this is from 2005. i would like it if you would read from here. >> perfect. yeah. this is a moment in the book where, i am kind of flipping out writing about my brother. i am listening to tapes, because of course i have gone back to the orchards, my brother has died at a young age. i have gone back to the orchards to do interviews, i keep doing this dancing about what it is really about. i am saying i am outside the event although in the middle of it. it is protection, part of the latex that is covers me. making tapes, to crack the grid that i can understand on situations that are incomprehensible. at this moment i want to change everything in me tobserver part and move into something else, the living your life part. when does that start, exactly? something else, i look into the mirror and someone says what are you doing here? you have no right to live. >> why did you become a reporter in the first place? >> it was stamped in my dna. i was so lucky, c
WETA
Oct 6, 2012 1:00am EDT
. and i had to wrap my mind around the idea of being a 29-year-old with a biography. tavis: no memoirs at 29. >> he said, i always wanted to do fiction. with his began brainstorming immediately. he said he wanted to do if in the world that i know. we just collectively created this world and these characters in this plot. we have been off to the races ever since. you know what? a thing of a little biased. because i am really close to it. but the response from the people that actually read it is phenomenal. his it is received very well. i can tell how anxious people are making sure that i expedited the process. you know, they were somewhat cost file and airports. how did you leave me hanging like that? it doesn't come out tomorrow? i am flattered by it. tavis: how is the process of writing music uniquely different or similar to creating characters in a book or novel. when you write songs, you create that as well. >> for the songs, unless it is like a complete fabricated story or narrative throughout the entire song, you have to continue to create plots and character development and keep
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
his memoirs, quote, her anguished cries and the sobs of her family gave me a lasting impression after her death. he was similarly affected by the mob in 1894 when ewe screen debs -- eugene debs led the strike on the pullman car company. warren's father was struck with the union, and one fight the members of the union gathered in an angry growl outside of union station, the main train station in los angeles. they hung a pan in effigy, and warren -- a man in effigy, and warren watched in terror. the experience he recalled decades later gave me a hour resource of -- horror of mob action which has remained with me to this day. as a young boy, warren moves to bakersfield which was his home for the rest of his youth. bakersfield at the turn of the sent prison is not quite the o.k. corral, but it was not so different either. it was a distinctly western town of a california variety. it was a railroad depot for the southern pacific. warren's father had been blacklisted after the strike, but they were so desperate for workers in the interior of california, that they accepted him in bakersfield.
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 11:15am EDT
of for fastening chapters. expanding on the first person examples, and memoirs, vidal told the tale through multiple and a raiders, a device that enabled him to use pieces of a voice he developed in his essays. he was better at showing -- that are at telling and showing anyway. and first person narrative is all telling. storytelling. the book came out in 1964 with excellent reviews. it was a surprise bestseller. he returned to edgewater, wrote more essays, more political journalism and it worked in other screenplays before he returned to rome to finish his washington novel. this is simply named washington, d.c. is a family saga about political life from the new deal to the mccarthy era. at bush in early 1957, it was a step backwards, a surprisingly clunky novel written mostly in expository dialogue. there's a promising subplot in the homoerotic bond between a newspaper publisher, a young politician, but vidal is limited by the conventions of third person fiction and his tendency to express strong emotion in a language of crashing melodrama. the book received mixed reviews, but it, t
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 6:00am EDT
had a bland memoir. clearly, ike valued milton. he said in various levels he could be president of the united states. obviously impossible. maybe not so impossible. look at the bush family. it didn't happen though. >> if i calculate this right, he was 63 to 70. >> he turned 70 in november of 1960. he was 70. he was the oldest president ever. he was 70 at jfk's inauguration. >> 63 to 70, and he was sick all that time. >> world war ii will take a toll out of you. he ate a lot of states. -- steaks. by modern standards, he did not have the healthiest diet. he quit smoking. four packs a day. it took a toll on him. his stomach was in bad shape. he had something wrong with his intestine. they had to operate. it was mostly a nervous stomach. he would get sick when he gave a very important speech. he gave a famous speech about the importance of peace. he was sweating and he was skipping pages because he was afraid he would have an unfortunate accident. >> i wrote down a lot of words used to describe him. i will mention them. give us a little touch of what you meant. you said he was manipula
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00pm EDT
simkin set down to write a fictionalized memoir about growing up in edgefield or lynch would as it appears in his text. it was never published and is preserved today only in his personal papers and longwood. the untitled manuscript is fascinating for the light it sheds on this one time neighbor. simkins grew up in a house right across from the strom thurmond grew up. simkins was five years older than strom thurmond. and he wrote about the two characters by the name hog stoops and his son, stone. these fictional characters follow thurmond's real-life accomplishment of will and strom thurmond as to make the pseudonyms perfect. one time simpkins even slips and refers to him as well. despite some minor errors in fact the manuscript provides an intimate perspective on well and strom thurmond and on edgefield. simkins treatment of hog stoops is relatively generous describing him as cold-blooded in his law practice, learned in the technicalities of the law with interest in justice for a black culture. simkins also pronounced him deserving of the honorary degree awarded him by the universi
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
virginia. i w as familiar with jennings memoir considered by the white house historical association to beof the first memoir of life in the white house. re itm was titled a colored man's reminiscence of james madison. and as the title implies, it's n more about the so-called brave man the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his retirement review his life's work designing and defending natural rights and self-government, paul was
SFGTV2
Oct 5, 2012 8:00am PDT
a memoir of going through india and what this has done to transform my own life. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >> [applause]. >> [applause]. we have a very special guest. [inaudible] is here with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause]. >> someone once told me this was from scandanavia. this is a different version. about 2 sisters that fall in love with the same guy. it didn't work out too well. one of the sisters throws another one into the raging water. he fashions her body into a fiddle, into a violin. this is the actual violin. i love her so much. [singing] [music playing]
SFGTV2
Oct 12, 2012 8:00am PDT
spending a great deal of time in india every year my next book is a memoir of going through india and what this has done to transform my own life. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >> [applause]. >> [applause]. we have a very special guest. [inaudible] is here with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause].
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his retirement review his life's work designing
WETA
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm EDT
author salman rushdie about his memoir on life on the run after being sentenced to death by iran's religious leader. >> if you had said to me, here's what's going to happen in the next 12 years, what sort of shape do you think you'll be in at the end? i would probably not have bet on myself to be in good shape, no. yet i somehow did survive it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives and truly profound ways. technology can provide customizedded experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> the william and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. snd by contributions to your pbs tation from viewers like you. thank you.
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
stocks in order for them to buy a car when .hey were in new york an >> the wrote a memoir. he got a tax deal. he had at least a half a million dollars in cash. he used it to buy the farm. he also got help from george allen, who had a farm next door. he had rich friends. ike's buddies bought him a house. he got a lot of guests. the rules were loser in those days. >> explain the business about them building a pond and putting fish in it so he could have fish to catch it. >> agusta wanted ike. his millionaire friends bought a house for him and dug a pond and put fish in it so ike could relax by facing -- by fishing when the weather was bad. >> did we know that back then? >> i am not sure. i am not sure they knew the detail about the pond. >> human. >> he could be. he had a great smile. a warmth that flooded over him. if you were around him over it -- a long enough, you also felt the cold side. >> expensive. >> he had a largeness about this. he did not get caught in petty details. he was a big picture guy. conquer europe. save the world. he thought in those terms. >> patient. >> he was
FOX
Oct 1, 2012 6:00am PDT
kind of got it. >> what he is telling us, his new him more hits book -- his new memoir hits book shelves. >>> this morning, highway 4, we will tell you about contra costa. and luckily i found an apartment just three blocks away from t.j.maxx, which was perfect because i needed everything and i still needed to make rent. t.j.maxx is such a great place cause i know when i go in there i'm gonna score. they've got such great deals on all my favorite brands. fashion direct from designers. savings direct to you. this maxxinista can make it anywhere. t.j.maxx. let us make a maxxinista out of you. . >>> sunny, clear, warm to hot near 100 degrees. >>> hello, here is a quick look at some of the top stories right now at 643, coast guard is still looking for two fishermen missing off the san mateo coast. two other fishermen who were on board were able to get back to shore safely. >>> police are investigating a double shooting that left a man and woman injured and it happened around midnight at 7th and filbert street. four people started shooting and so far no arrests have been made. >>> and
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 10:30am EDT
, francis felt that simpkins sat down to write a fictionalized memoir about growing up in ashfield barbiturate as it appears in his text. it was never published and is preserved today only in his personal papers. the untitled manuscript is fascinating for the later sheds on his one-time neighbors. simkin screwup across and was five years older than strom thurmond. and he wrote about two characters, with a name hog stews and his son, stone. and these fictional areas follow so exactly the real-life accomplishments of will and strong thurmond to make the pseudonym superfluous. simkin sivan flipped and referred to hogs do. despite the minor errors, the manuscript provides an intimate live on willem strom thurmond. simkin's treatment is relatively generous, describing holidays cold-blooded and his law practice, learned in the technicalities of the law without the remotest interest or impolite culture. he also pronounced him deserving of the honorary degree awarded him by the university of south carolina. he was man of moderation and charity who refuse to speak unkindly if anyone's at th
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 7:30am EDT
, "the distance between us: a memoir," a simon & schuster title. you are watching booktv on c-span 2. >> joseph wheelan recounts the life of general sure didn't who forced the surrender of robert e. lee at appomattox courthouse. the author recalls general sure didn't postwar career, which included command of the u.s. army. it's about 45 minutes. >> i want to thank quiller ridge books for inviting me back and all of you people for coming out to hear about general bill sheridan, who out of the triumvirate of union generals credited with winning civil war companies probably the least known of them. the others being ulysses s. grant and william tecumseh sherman. 1937, the three generals appear together in a commemorative postage stamp. as part of a series with great u.s. military commanders. and to his right is sherman and sheridan is on grants left. this is appropriate because by the time the civil war ended, sheraton was sometimes referred to as the left hand of grant of the left-handed. he was 10 years younger than grant and sherman. he was a dynamo, inspired his men with his intensit
FOX News
Oct 1, 2012 5:00am EDT
. >> arnold schwarzenegger's memoir total recall my unbelievably true life story hits store shelves today. ahead of that memoir which recalls his affair with a housekeeper that resulted in a love child and ended the marriage of maria schriver. the california governor revealing the moment when his wife confronted him about his love child. >> that visit is the visit where she said hey, i think that joseph is your kid. and am i off here on this or not? i said you are absolutely correct. i had to face up to that which i have been hiding no one knew about but i knew about it at that time maybe for five six years or so. >>> you just said you are absolutely right. i am sorry. it was very painful for her. she was very disappointed. >> maria asked you yp didn't you tell me? what did you say? >> that i did not know how to>> how to tell her. >> without worrying about that it would get out or whatever. >> and that she would leave you while you were still governor? >> i don't think that that was as much an issue as just how to keep this under wraps. >> be sure to watch fox and friends. he will b
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 11:00pm EDT
association tof be the first memoir of life in the white house.nocences of jams madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his retirement review his life's work designing and defending natural rights and self-government, paul was there to hear it all, and in the book, i developed the thesis that he was able to absorb the theoretica
ABC
Oct 28, 2012 7:00am EDT
career and future prospects at goldman sachs. how accurate is your memoir? goldman is saying your motivations are different, that you weren't being paid enough. >> first thing you have to ask yourself is by goldman attacking me as h hard as they are and no addressing the issues raised you have to ask yourself is there something they don't want coming out? i i saw someone quoted saying gd mavn was relieved by what is in my book. i would say to you, maybe people on wall street feelt feel that way. but i guarantee people outside of wall street who read t this book they won't find things like ripping up pension funds or betting against your clients or 'ole selling one that people don't understand will not be pleased and will find it egregious. look at what the market is telling you and where stockholders are valueing jpmorgan, goldman sachs, a lot of them are below lick kwi dags. even investors don't like this business model. >> after you resigned and hit the send button, didou feel any moment of oh, my god, what did i do? >> i actually felt proud. i wanted toed spark a debate that i
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 4:30am EDT
, never did interviews, never wrote her own memoirs. and mrs. nixon was somebody i tried to bring to life in the book. >> you have written several historical fiction books, nonfiction, novels. how do you approach historical
NBC
Oct 3, 2012 4:30am EDT
promoting his new memoir total recall. he took part in a question and answer session and later autographed copies of the book. schwarzenegger took blame for having an extramarital affair with his house keeper. many fans at last night's event say don't think that the relationship -- they don't think the relationship should define who he is. >> because that's not all of who he is. as he said, he had 640 pages of his life and ten pages on that and that's what people are picking on. and i think he's done a lot of valuable movies and politics and made a lot of contributions. >> overall it doesn't change my view of it him. i've always looked at him as an actor and i think his personal life is his personal life however screwed up or not it is. that's his life. >> last night's signing was sold out. >>> it's not quite christmas, but it's time to select this year's white house christmas tree. last year's tree came from wisconsin and this year the tree will hail from north carolina. this morning officials will visit farms to pick just the right true, but it won't be harvested until late n
WHUT
Oct 11, 2012 8:00am EDT
. that comes up also sometimes. tavis: when you were here last, you were talking about your -- memoir. your book came out. since you were here last, your father put a book out about his life with you. you wrote your book -- your book was dedicated to your father. he was very tough on you when you were a kid, your father was. is dedicated your book and you are 30 and her father wrote a book about his life with you. what most wounded your touch do about what your father had to say about you in his book? >> i was crying when i was reading his book. it is only in chinese but it will be translated. i realize actually he was, he was a warm person but he is trying to hide his emotions. for me, it feels kind of strange. i thought he was very strict. i thought he was very crucial. he really loved me so much in a very different way than what i thought. there are many stories he shared. like decisions, where he made those decisions. -- why he made those decisions. i really respect because after so many years it feels like i'm starting to realize how, to know my father as a person rather than jus
CBS
Oct 1, 2012 4:00am PDT
schwarzenegger's new memoir hit the stores today. he spoekd about the scandal that ruined his marriage with sylvester stallone on "60 minutes" on sunday. he said he never talked to their housekeeper about their son. >> it appeared to me that there was something off, he started to look like me. that's when i kind of got it, that it was never discussed but i put things together here. >> did you ask here? her name is mildred. did you ask mildred? >> no, i didn't. but i felt that i should take on the responsibility of taking care of him and her. so i took care of them financially. >> all of a sudden she started getting money. no, you must have said, you know, i want to take care of him. how does money start showing up >> i gave it to her and she knew what it was. >> you can see more on cbsnews.com. cbs money watch. tens of thousands protest in paris and the big guns come out for a gangster auction. ashley morrison has more. >> reporter: good morning. more anti-austerity protests taking place in europe over the weekend. in paris thousands took part in peaceful demonstrations. on friday the frenc
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 330 (some duplicates have been removed)